A year in review

My baby turned one this week. In some ways, I can hardly believe I am the mother of a one-year-old, and in other ways it feels like this milestone took an age to arrive.

I have no doubt that parenting is one of the hardest and most challenging experiences of ones life, exasperated for me by the fact that I was unwilling to let go of my writing during those tough early months.

I didn’t write every day. Not even every week. I wrote some poems when I felt overwhelmed. I wrote in my journal a heck of a lot. But I didn’t really open my manuscript for fear that I would get immersed in it and my baby would wake up screaming. Which he did. A lot.

I feel like he didn’t sleep for the first 6 months. Certainly not in blocks of any longer than 2 hours overnight, 20 minutes during the day. He only started to figure out the whole sleep thing at 10 months. But it’s only been since 11 months that he’s consistently been sleeping through the night, and sleeping in wonderful long stints of an hour or more during the day. You will never appreciate a sleeping baby more than when you experience a baby who doesn’t quite “get” sleep.

Aside form keeping my son alive, I actually managed to progress my manuscript quite a lot in the past year. Something I didn’t think would be possible when I was in the depths of sleep deprivation.

After receiving such generous and heart warming support on my recent post over on Louise Allan’s Writers in the Attic, I began to reflect on exactly what I have achieved in this past year. Not just in my journey as a parent, but in my journey as a writer.

Though I still have a long way to go, I think it’s important to acknowledge how far I’ve come. And in an effort to do that for myself, I’m sharing my achievements with you all, here.

When my baby was 8 months old, in my sleep deprived state, I took myself off to Fiona McIntosh’s Commercial Fiction Masterclass. This was five intensive days in a room of 15 other fabulous writers, learning to hone our craft, navigate the publishing industry and basically get down to business. I credit Fiona and this masterclass to kicking my butt into gear and really committing myself to this manuscript.

I worked a reworked a synopsis and submitted it and my first three chapters to the Richell Prize for Emerging Writers. If you’d asked me 6 months ago how confident I was of my work, I would have told you it would never see the light of day. So to submit to such a popular and prestigious award (even with reservations), goes to show how much my confidence in myself has grown.

On advice from Fiona, I changed the names of my character’s and the working title of my WIP – which resulted in a snowball effect of changes to my entire manuscript. At first, this was incredibly daunting, but in actual fact, it’s returned some of the joy and pleasure back into my rewrites. Everything just seems to fit better.

I sorted out my home office. It may seem small, but for me it’s a really big improvement. In order to feel motivated to write, I need a good space. Something with natural lighting and a decent chair. Though I can (and often do) write anywhere, having a dedicated space makes me feel all that more professional.

I’ve made headway on social media, particularly on Twitter where I get a real sense of what a writing community is all about. I fell out of love with facebook but have since decided to modify my personal page as my writing page. I was going to set up an ‘author’ page, but I bulk at the thought of having another space to manage. So instead, I’m taking Valerie Khoo’s advice and using my personal page as my Facebook writing platform.

I started doing some freelance writing and editing. I don’t want to spread myself too thin, so I’m selective of my clients and the time I can put towards freelancing, but I’m enjoying the diversity of work and the options it may afford me in the future.

I started an interview series with and for my fellow emerging writers: The Writer’s Room.

And I created this blog!

 

Thank you to each and every one of you who have followed along with me on this journey, sent me encouraging words through social media or email, commented on my posts and supported me when I’ve complained or exclaimed about anything and everything going on in my life. Your support and encouragement means the world to me. X

Poetry & Prose

What is poetry, if not the expression of ones feelings in a way that ignites feelings in another?

For the longest time, I shied away from poetry.

As a young child I loved words that rhymed. It was like this neat little trick you could play with words. Suddenly, a boring word like ‘style’ became infinitely more magical when paired with ‘smile’. I wrote lots of little poems as a child and enjoyed homework that included writing of almost any kind. But somewhere along the way I lost my nerve in poetry. I can’t pinpoint it exactly, probably sometime in later high school or even university, when ‘Poetry’ became a subject to study, rather than a fun thing to dabble in.

That was until I discovered a world of poetry on social media.

The beauty of social media is that we get the chance to experience words in their most raw and concise form. Poetry is easy to share. Its succinctness lends itself to the limited characters of Twitter, or the visual format of Instagram. Finding inspiration is easy when you know where to look. I find the likes of R.M. Drake, JM Storm and Lang Leav inspire me to not only experiment with short form prose, but to share what I’ve written as well.

By nature, I still prefer to write and read long form fiction, but now that I’ve let go of the academia of poetry I’ve opened myself up to it once again. Allowing me to experiment with words and sentence structure, sounds and rhythm. Words become playful and fun when we strip them back and let the feeling overshadow the meaning.

Now that I’ve been experimenting with poetry I have a far greater appreciation for it. I was recently gifted ‘The Nightingales are Drunk’ by Hafez and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Do you enjoy poetry and if so, is there any you can recommend me to read?